News

What the Colts' Horrific Loss to the Rams Illustrates

Posted on November 10, 2013 at 3:05 PM

It's just one game. Remember that.


No matter how humiliating, no matter how horrific -- it's just one game.


Today, the Indianapolis Colts lost 38-8 to a bad St. Louis Rams team led by Kellen Clemens, a backup quarterback who hasn't started more than 3 games in one year since Andrew Luck was a teenager. Though the Rams came into Indianapolis as one of the weaker teams the NFL had to offer, they defeated the Colts handily in Indy.


Remember the big to-do that was made of the Colts victory over the Broncos and the criticism of Peyton Manning that ensued?


Stupidity must be in vogue, because despite Manning leading the league in both passing yards and touchdown passes in Week 7, people were quick to jump on the Andrew Luck bandwagon. It didn't matter to them that Luck hasn't been prodctive, accurate or efficent so far in 2013


Against a weak Rams defense this week, Luck struggled to perform at a pro football level -- leading the Colts to only 8 total points. After throwing his third interception of the game, the Colts pulled Luck in favor of Matt Hasselbeck as they had no chance to come back and beat the Rams who had overwhelmed them all day.


Andrew Luck (vs. Rams): 29 of 47 for 353 yards, 1 touchdown and 3 interceptions. 65.3 passer rating.

 

Kellen Clemens (vs. Colts): 9 of 16 for 247 yards, 2 touchdowns and 0 interceptions. 140.6 passer rating.


Luck's ineptitude against a bad football team, in reality, casts a far darker cloud over his season than Manning's productive output against an elite Colts defense casts over his. It shouldn't take such dramatic examples of the "any given Sunday" mantra to make fans wake up and realize how senseless it is to assign an inordinate amount of value to the results of any one game.


It's obvious that Luck will be far less criticized for his poor performance at home against a bad team than Manning was for his good performance on the road against a so-called elite team. The treatment of the two quarterbacks by the media is transparent. Thankfully, that doesn't change the reality.

Categories: None